• Our aim is to advance our understanding of biological systems,

    ranging from single species to multi-species systems and ecosystems,

    based on data from large-scale bioanalytical methods.

  • We develop, improve and apply

    computational methods

    for the interpretation of molecular information in biology.

  • We establish and analyse

    quantitative mathematical models.

CUBE News

  • Harald Marx starts Computational Peptidomics Group at CUBE

    21.08.17
    Personal

    Dr. Harald Marx is a Bioinformatician by training. During his PhD in Bernhard Kuster's Lab at TU Munich he developed tools and statistical approaches for proteogenomics and structural genome annotation. As a PostDoc fellow in Joshua Coon's lab at the University of ...

  • Symposium "Computational Approaches in Precision Medicine" Jul 27/28 in Vienna

    27.07.17
    Event

    The CUBE team and the research focus "Computational Life Sciences" teamed up with David Kreil and Pawel Labaj (BOKU University) in organizing the symposium "Computational Approaches in Precision Medicine" Jul 27/28. The meeting takes place in the BIG lecture hall ...

  • FIRST RELEASE OF 45 PICA MODELS READY FOR DOWNLOAD

    12.06.17
    News

    The first release of 45 PICA models is available on this site in the Download area of our new website PhenDB. Brief instructions on the download page will enable you to install the PICA software and the models on a ...

  • Dr. rer. nat. Thomas Eder

    18.04.17
    Personal

    Thomas Eder has successfully defended his PhD thesis "Bioinformatic analysis of host-pathogen interactions in the light of second generation sequencing technologies". He was examined by Prof. Thomas Miethke, University of Heidelberg, Prof. Heinz Himmelbauer, BOKU University, and Prof. Arndt von Haeseler, ...

Latest publications

Sulfonolipids as novel metabolite markers of Alistipes and Odoribacter affected by high-fat diets.

The gut microbiota generates a huge pool of unknown metabolites, and their identification and characterization is a key challenge in metabolomics. However, there are still gaps on the studies of gut microbiota and their chemical structures. In this investigation, an unusual class of bacterial sulfonolipids (SLs) is detected in mouse cecum, which was originally found in environmental microbes. We have performed a detailed molecular level characterization of this class of lipids by combining high-resolution mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography analysis. Eighteen SLs that differ in their capnoid and fatty acid chain compositions were identified. The SL called "sulfobacin B" was isolated, characterized, and was significantly increased in mice fed with high-fat diets. To reveal bacterial producers of SLs, metagenome analysis was acquired and only two bacterial genera, i.e., Alistipes and Odoribacter, were revealed to be responsible for their production. This knowledge enables explaining a part of the molecular complexity introduced by microbes to the mammalian gastrointestinal tract and can be used as chemotaxonomic evidence in gut microbiota.

Walker A, Pfitzner B, Harir M, Schaubeck M, Calasan J, Heinzmann SS, Turaev D, Rattei T, Endesfelder D, Castell WZ, Haller D, Schmid M, Hartmann A, Schmitt-Kopplin P
2017 - Sci Rep, 1: 11047

Minimum information about a single amplified genome (MISAG) and a metagenome-assembled genome (MIMAG) of bacteria and archaea.

We present two standards developed by the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC) for reporting bacterial and archaeal genome sequences. Both are extensions of the Minimum Information about Any (x) Sequence (MIxS). The standards are the Minimum Information about a Single Amplified Genome (MISAG) and the Minimum Information about a Metagenome-Assembled Genome (MIMAG), including, but not limited to, assembly quality, and estimates of genome completeness and contamination. These standards can be used in combination with other GSC checklists, including the Minimum Information about a Genome Sequence (MIGS), Minimum Information about a Metagenomic Sequence (MIMS), and Minimum Information about a Marker Gene Sequence (MIMARKS). Community-wide adoption of MISAG and MIMAG will facilitate more robust comparative genomic analyses of bacterial and archaeal diversity.

Bowers RM, Kyrpides NC, Stepanauskas R, Harmon-Smith M, Doud D, Reddy TBK, Schulz F, Jarett J, Rivers AR, Eloe-Fadrosh EA, Tringe SG, Ivanova NN, Copeland A, Clum A, Becraft ED, Malmstrom RR, Birren B, Podar M, Bork P, Weinstock GM, Garrity GM, Dodsworth JA, Yooseph S, Sutton G, Glöckner FO, Gilbert JA, Nelson WC, Hallam SJ, Jungbluth SP, Ettema TJG, Tighe S, Konstantinidis KT, Liu WT, Baker BJ, Rattei T, Eisen JA, Hedlund B, McMahon KD, Fierer N, Knight R, Finn R, Cochrane G, Karsch-Mizrachi I, Tyson GW, Rinke C, Lapidus A, Meyer F, Yilmaz P, Parks DH, Eren AM, Schriml L, Banfield JF, Hugenholtz P, Woyke T
2017 - Nat. Biotechnol., 8: 725-731

The desert plant Phoenix dactylifera closes stomata via nitrate-regulated SLAC1 anion channel.

Date palm Phoenix dactylifera is a desert crop well adapted to survive and produce fruits under extreme drought and heat. How are palms under such harsh environmental conditions able to limit transpirational water loss? Here, we analysed the cuticular waxes, stomata structure and function, and molecular biology of guard cells from P. dactylifera. To understand the stomatal response to the water stress phytohormone of the desert plant, we cloned the major elements necessary for guard cell fast abscisic acid (ABA) signalling and reconstituted this ABA signalosome in Xenopus oocytes. The PhoenixSLAC1-type anion channel is regulated by ABA kinase PdOST1. Energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXA) demonstrated that date palm guard cells release chloride during stomatal closure. However, in Cl(-) medium, PdOST1 did not activate the desert plant anion channel PdSLAC1 per se. Only when nitrate was present at the extracellular face of the anion channel did the OST1-gated PdSLAC1 open, thus enabling chloride release. In the presence of nitrate, ABA enhanced and accelerated stomatal closure. Our findings indicate that, in date palm, the guard cell osmotic motor driving stomatal closure uses nitrate as the signal to open the major anion channel SLAC1. This initiates guard cell depolarization and the release of anions together with potassium.

Müller HM, Schäfer N, Bauer H, Geiger D, Lautner S, Fromm J, Riederer M, Bueno A, Nussbaumer T, Mayer K, Alquraishi SA, Alfarhan AH, Neher E, Al-Rasheid KAS, Ache P, Hedrich R
2017 - New Phytol., in press