Publications

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Publications in peer reviewed journals

4 Publications found
  • Assessment of urban microbiome assemblies with the help of targeted in silico gold standards.

    Gerner SM, Rattei T, Graf AB
    2018 - Biol. Direct, 1: 22

    Abstract: 

    Microbial communities play a crucial role in our environment and may influence human health tremendously. Despite being the place where human interaction is most abundant we still know little about the urban microbiome. This is highlighted by the large amount of unclassified DNA reads found in urban metagenome samples. The only in silico approach that allows us to find unknown species, is the assembly and classification of draft genomes from a metagenomic dataset. In this study we (1) investigate the applicability of an assembly and binning approach for urban metagenome datasets, and (2) develop a new method for the generation of in silico gold standards to better understand the specific challenges of such datasets and provide a guide in the selection of available software.
    We applied combinations of three assembly (Megahit, SPAdes and MetaSPAdes) and three binning tools (MaxBin, MetaBAT and CONCOCT) to whole genome shotgun datasets from the CAMDA 2017 Challenge. Complex in silico gold standards with a simulated bacterial fraction were generated for representative samples of each surface type and city. Using these gold standards, we found the combination of SPAdes and MetaBAT to be optimal for urban metagenome datasets by providing the best trade-off between the number of high-quality genome draft bins (MIMAG standards) retrieved, the least amount of misassemblies and contamination. The assembled draft genomes included known species like Propionibacterium acnes but also novel species according to respective ANI values.
    In our work, we showed that, even for datasets with high diversity and low sequencing depth from urban environments, assembly and binning-based methods can provide high-quality genome drafts. Of vital importance to retrieve high-quality genome drafts is sequence depth but even more so a high proportion of the bacterial sequence fraction too achieve high coverage for bacterial genomes. In contrast to read-based methods relying on database knowledge, genome-centric methods as applied in this study can provide valuable information about unknown species and strains as well as functional contributions of single community members within a sample. Furthermore, we present a method for the generation of sample-specific highly complex in silico gold standards.
    This article was reviewed by Craig Herbold, Serghei Mangul and Yana Bromberg.

  • The Iceman's Last Meal Consisted of Fat, Wild Meat, and Cereals.

    Maixner F, Turaev D, Cazenave-Gassiot A, Janko M, Krause-Kyora B, Hoopmann MR, Kusebauch U, Sartain M, Guerriero G, O'Sullivan N, Teasdale M, Cipollini G, Paladin A, Mattiangeli V, Samadelli M, Tecchiati U, Putzer A, Palazoglu M, Meissen J, Lösch S, Rausch P, Baines JF, Kim BJ, An HJ, Gostner P, Egarter-Vigl E, Malfertheiner P, Keller A, Stark RW, Wenk M, Bishop D, Bradley DG, Fiehn O, Engstrand L, Moritz RL, Doble P, Franke A, Nebel A, Oeggl K, Rattei T, Grimm R, Zink A
    2018 - Curr. Biol., 14: 2348-2355.e9

    Abstract: 

    The history of humankind is marked by the constant adoption of new dietary habits affecting human physiology, metabolism, and even the development of nutrition-related disorders. Despite clear archaeological evidence for the shift from hunter-gatherer lifestyle to agriculture in Neolithic Europe [1], very little information exists on the daily dietary habits of our ancestors. By undertaking a complementary -omics approach combined with microscopy, we analyzed the stomach content of the Iceman, a 5,300-year-old European glacier mummy [2, 3]. He seems to have had a remarkably high proportion of fat in his diet, supplemented with fresh or dried wild meat, cereals, and traces of toxic bracken. Our multipronged approach provides unprecedented analytical depth, deciphering the nutritional habit, meal composition, and food-processing methods of this Copper Age individual.

  • Corrigendum: Minimum information about a single amplified genome (MISAG) and a metagenome-assembled genome (MIMAG) of bacteria and archaea.

    Bowers RM, Kyrpides NC, Stepanauskas R, Harmon-Smith M, Doud D, Reddy TBK, Schulz F, Jarett J, Rivers AR, Eloe-Fadrosh EA, Tringe SG, Ivanova NN, Copeland A, Clum A, Becraft ED, Malmstrom RR, Birren B, Podar M, Bork P, Weinstock GM, Garrity GM, Dodsworth JA, Yooseph S, Sutton G, Glöckner FO, Gilbert JA, Nelson WC, Hallam SJ, Jungbluth SP, Ettema TJG, Tighe S, Konstantinidis KT, Liu WT, Baker BJ, Rattei T, Eisen JA, Hedlund B, McMahon KD, Fierer N, Knight R, Finn R, Cochrane G, Karsch-Mizrachi I, Tyson GW, Rinke C, Lapidus A, Meyer F, Yilmaz P, Parks DH, Eren AM, Schriml L, Banfield JF, Hugenholtz P, Woyke T
    2018 - Nat. Biotechnol., 7: 660
  • Interplay between gut microbiota metabolism and inflammation in HIV infection.

    Vázquez-Castellanos JF, Serrano-Villar S, Jiménez-Hernández N, Soto Del Rio MD, Gayo S, Rojo D, Ferrer M, Barbas C, Moreno S, Estrada V, Rattei T, Latorre A, Moya A, Gosalbes MJ
    2018 - ISME J, 8: 1964-1976

    Abstract: 

    HIV infection causes a disruption of gut-associated lymphoid tissue, driving a shift in the composition of gut microbiota. A deeper understanding of the metabolic changes and how they affect the interplay with the host is needed. Here, we assessed functional modifications of HIV-associated microbiota by combining metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses. The transcriptionally active microbiota was well-adapted to the inflamed environment, overexpressing pathways related to resistance to oxidative stress. Furthermore, gut inflammation was maintained by the Gram-negative nature of the HIV-associated microbiota and underexpression of anti-inflammatory processes, such as short chain fatty acid biosynthesis or indole production. We performed co-occurrence and metabolic network analyses that showed relevance in the microbiota structure of both taxonomic and metabolic HIV-associated biomarkers. The Bayesian network revealed the most determinant pathways for maintaining the structure stability of the bacterial community. In addition, we identified the taxa's contribution to metabolic activities and their interactions with host health.

Book chapters and other publications

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